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Local Points of Interest

There are two significant historic sites within a few minutes of our Museum.  Both are worthy of your time and the stories they represent warrant your exploration.

The Frenchman Butte National Historic Site

The Frenchman Butte National Historic Site commemorates the battle between Canadian Militia forces and Cree Warriors on May 28, 1885.  This historic site is located only 6 kilometers to the north-east of our museum with signage indicating the way.  Here the original “rifle-pits” of 300 Cree warriors are still evident; changing little over the last 125 years or so.  The Cree, numbering over 1500, sought protection from the gun-fire of General Strange’s military while their warriors repulsed his similar sized force of the attacking Alberta Field Force.  This was to be the last battle in Canadian history, fought by Canadian Troops on Canadian soil.  The battle proved indecisive as both sides retired from the conflict with minimal casualties.

 
One of the original Cree Warriors’ “rifle-pits”, on the battle line.

One of the original Cree Warriors’ “rifle-pits”, on the battle line.
 
Military positions were on the opposite side of the valley.  On the south rim of the valley the Alberta Field Force took up positions with the intent on launching an attack on the fortifications of the Cree warriors above, on the opposite side.  Quagmire conditions precluded any possible frontal assault to succeed consequently the battle on the morning of May 28, 1885 degenerated into a long range exchange of rifle and field gun fire.

Military Monument on the south rim of the valley

Militia monument on the south side of the valley.
Cree positions were across the valley


Our Canadian Military visits the Frenchman Butte Museum Historic Site

Our Canadian Military visits the Frenchman Butte National Historic Site.

 
Google Map to the Frenchman Butte National Historic Site
Fort Pitt

Fort Pitt is a Saskatchewan Provincial Historic Park located about 16 kilometers to the west, just south, off secondary Highway 797.  Fort Pitt was a Hudson’s Bay Company Fort, built by trader Patrick Small in 1829.  It was strategically located half way between Fort Carlton and Fort Edmonton and served for a little less than 50 years before accidentally burning.  A second, fort soon replaced the initial facility and this collection of new buildings lacked any defensive features such as palisades and bastions.  This trading post, was situated approximately 100 meters to the west of the first, eventually falling victim to the siege of Cree warriors who sacked and burned it during the North West Rebellion in the spring of 1885. This site has had recent tourism enhancements which includes both sites being defined by timbers outlining the buildings and story boards provided for the visitor containing the pertinent details.

 
The first Fort Pitt, an artwork by Paul Kane, 1846.

The first Fort Pitt, an artwork by Paul Kane, 1846.


A tour group explores Fort Pitt as it is today.

A tour group explores Fort Pitt as it is today.

The year 2010 marked a very important year in history.  
Visit our museum or click HERE for more information: 


Google Map to Fort Pitt
 
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